Gautam Kumar

Data Scientist

Every company at some point in time does repetitive work. That’s a good thing. But if the process is not well documented, it would lead to breakdowns in the future. These breakdowns are not good for the clients and the business as a whole. Therefore, the documentation process should be given as much importance as we give to the development process. So let’s start off with a brief introduction about DocFX, GitHub and DevOps. I hope that you didn’t face any trouble in Part 1 & Part 2of the blog post. Let us resume where we left off:

Step 17: Click on the Variable Tab and the variables mentioned in the script file which was created in Step 5.

  • AZUREAPPID –> It is the Azure App ID. It can be found at Azure Active Directory –> App Registration –> Overview
  • AZUREAPPKEY -> It is the Azure App Key. It can be generated at Azure Active Directory –> App Registration –> Certificates & secrets –> New Client Secret.
  • AZUREAPPTENANT -> It is the Azure App Tenant ID. It can be found at Azure Active Directory –> App Registration –> Overview
  • AZURESTORAGE -> It is the name of Azure StorageV2 (general purpose v2). You need to enable “Static Website” on this storage
  • DOCSFOLDER -> It is the name of the folder where DocFx resides. In our case, it is “docs” which is shown in Step 4

Step 18: Add contributor role to App

Step 19: In order to edit the documentation from Github, select Enable continuous integration

Step 20: Click on Run Pipeline.

Step 21: If the Pipeline is successful you would be able to see your documentation on the URL mentioned on the Azure Storage –> Static Website.

Link to Part-1

Link to Part-2

Categories:

  • Azure
  • Engineering
  • Integrations
Recommended Articles:
Contact Us